The Attacks on Pearl Harbor were the first "Breaking News" Bulletin on television

The Attacks on Pearl Harbor were the first "Breaking News" Bulletin on television
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News bulletins have been a fixture of radio broadcasting since at least the 1920s. Examples of early news bulletins in the Golden Age of Radio include fictionalized versions in the 1938 radio drama The War of the Worlds and coverage of the attack on Pearl Harbor, which was also the first television news bulletin, reported on stations in New York and Pennsylvania. In the decades before the 24-hour news networks such as CNN, programming interruptions were restricted to extremely urgent news, such as the death of an important political figure. For example, one of the earliest such interruptions that modern viewers would recognize as "breaking news" coverage was for the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy in 1963, (with CBS News anchorman Walter Cronkite's coverage being especially noted), and as such reflected the relatively crude technology and procedures of that era. Such breaks are now common at 24-hour news channels which may have an anchor available for live interruption at any time. Some networks, such as Sky News, largely emphasize this, even advertising the station as being "first for breaking news". @Curionic

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