Bushnell offered the bonus because he disliked how new Atari games required 150 to 170 chips; he knew that Jobs’ friend Steve Wozniak, an employee of Hewlett-Packard, had designed a version of Pong that used about 30 chips.[4] Jobs had little specialized knowledge of circuit board design but knew Wozniak was capable of producing designs with a small number of chips. He convinced Wozniak to work with him, promising to split the fee evenly between them if Wozniak could minimize the number of chips. Wozniak had no sketches and instead interpreted the game from its description. To save parts, he had “tricky little designs” difficult to understand for most engineers. Near the end of development, Wozniak considered moving the high score to the screen’s top, but Jobs claimed Bushnell wanted it at the bottom; Wozniak was unaware of any truth to his claims. The original deadline was met after Wozniak worked at Atari four nights straight, doing some additional designs while at his day job at Hewlett-Packard. This equated to a bonus of $5,000, which Jobs kept secret from Wozniak. Wozniak has stated he only received payment of $350;[5][6][7][8][9][10] he believed for years that Atari had promised $700 for a design using fewer than 50 chips, and $1000 for fewer than 40, stating in 1984 “we only got 700 bucks for it.” Wozniak was the engineer, and Jobs was the breadboarder and tester. Wozniak’s original design used 42 chips; the final, working breadboard he and Jobs delivered to Atari used 44, but Wozniak said, “We were so tired we couldn’t cut it down.”[4]

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