One result of the furor was the firing of five radio DJs who had encouraged listeners to search for backward messages in their record collections.[16] A more serious consequence was legislation by the state governments of Arkansas and California. The 1983 California bill was introduced to prevent backmasking that “can manipulate our behavior without our knowledge or consent and turn us into disciples of the Antichrist”.[26] Involved in the discussion on the bill was a California State Assembly Consumer Protection and Toxic Materials Committee hearing, during which “Stairway to Heaven” was played backwards, and William Yaroll testified.[27] The successful bill made the distribution of records with undeclared backmasking an invasion of privacy for which the distributor could be sued.[21] The Arkansas law passed unanimously in 1983, referenced albums by The Beatles, Pink Floyd, Electric Light Orchestra, Queen and Styx,[17] and mandated that records with backmasking include a warning sticker: “Warning: This record contains backward masking which may be perceptible at a subliminal level when the record is played forward.” However, the bill was returned to the state senate by Governor Bill Clinton and defeated.[21] House Resolution 6363, introduced in 1982 by Representative Bob Dornan (R-California), proposed mandating a similar label;[28] the bill was referred to the Subcommittee on Commerce, Transportation and Tourism and was never passed.[29] Government action was also called for in the legislatures of Texas and Canada.[21]
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