In England, the evolution of the main course into turkey did not take place for years, or even centuries. At first, in medieval England, the main course was either a peacock or a boar, the boar usually the mainstay. The turkey appeared on Christmas tables in England in the 16th century,[8] and popular history tells of King Henry VIII being first English monarch to have turkey for Christmas.[9] The 16th century farmer Thomas Tusser noted that by 1573 turkeys were commonly served at English Christmas dinners.[6] The tradition of turkey at Christmas rapidly spread throughout England in the 17th century,[8] and it also became common to serve goose which remained the predominant roast until the Victorian era.[10] (it was quite common for Goose “Clubs” to be set up, allowing working-class families to save up over the year towards a goose before this).[11] A famous Christmas dinner scene appears in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol (1843), where Scrooge sends Bob Cratchitt a large turkey.[12] The pudding course of a British Christmas dinner may often be Christmas pudding, which dates from medieval England.[13] Trifle, mince pies, Christmas cake or a yule log are also popular.[14]

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