Although anti-miscegenation amendments were proposed in United States Congress in 1871, 1912–1913 and 1928,[5][6] a nationwide law against racially mixed marriages was never enacted. Prior to the California Supreme Court’s ruling in Perez v. Sharp (1948), no court in the United States had ever struck down a ban on interracial marriage. In 1967, the United States Supreme Court unanimously ruled in Loving v. Virginia that anti-miscegenation laws are unconstitutional, relying partially on Perez. With this ruling, these laws were no longer in effect in the remaining 16 states that at the time still enforced them. However, the active repeal of the laws was not complete until Alabama did so in 2000 after failing to do so in several earlier referendums on the matter.[7] At the time, nearly 526,000 people voted against the repeal.[8

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